Newman residents in fear of losing their homes due to flooding

                Residents along the San Joaquin River in Stanislaus County are bracing for potentially severe flooding as water levels continue to rise.  Mobile home residents at Fisherman's Bend near the community of Newmanpacked up their trailers on Friday and hauled them to higher ground amid evacuation warnings.  But a lot of there residents are still trying to figure out a plan of action.  Much of the land was surrounded by water just feet away from ground level.  In some parts, the water was rushing over some roads.  Eric Bradley is a long-time resident who says he lived at Fisherman's Bend when the area was overtaken by floods in 2017. He says it took him 3 to 4 months to be able to return once water levels went down.  Bradley is hoping he won't see a similar situation this week and has already jumped into action for his neighbors.“For almost two weeks now, I moved two and a half trailer parks, everybody's trailers, their vehicles, all their possessions by myself ,” Bradley said.  “Now the water's cresting, my stuff's still down there and I have to get it up, and now my road is rotting away.”The road he described is a short distance from his trailer and leads out toward a main road.  Residents still hauled their vehicles in and out through the rushing water.  It's a risky move, but Bradley says he's determined to move through it if need be. A property manager told KCRA 3 some residents are unprepared to leave their homes, fearing they'll have nowhere to go and could lose all their belongings in the event of major flooding.  He expressed concern that leftover materials including metal and wood planks from the construction site of a nearby bridge might be causing blockage and leading to rising water levels.  Sam Chrun, senior civil engineer for the county's public works department says the county has evaluated the county's Crows Landing Road Bridge Replacement Project site to ensure there is no blockage that would keep water from flowing through.  “There is a trestle in the channel that was installed and is used to mobilize equipment into the channel to build the bridge,” Chrun said.  “However, as a condition of our environmental permits, the trestle had to be modified in storm events prior to suspending work.  This modification was completed by the contractor prior to the project's suspension.”Chrun added that the site is a safe enough distance around 6 miles away so as to not cause any flooding.  Meanwhile, water levels continue to rise, and residents say they are struggling with backups in their water systems.  An evacuation center is set up at Yolo Middle School. Residents say they will be spending the night there if conditions get worse. 
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                <strong class="dateline">NEWMAN, Calif.  —</strong>                                             <p>Residents along the San Joaquin River in Stanislaus County are bracing for potentially severe flooding as water levels continue to rise. 

Mobile home residents at Fisherman’s Bend near the community of Newmanpacked up their trailers on Friday and hauled them to higher ground amid evacuation warnings. But a lot of there residents are still trying to figure out a plan of action.

Much of the land was surrounded by water just feet away from ground level. In some parts, the water was rushing over some roads.

Eric Bradley is a long-time resident who says he lived at Fisherman’s Bend when the area was overtaken by floods in 2017. He says it took him 3 to 4 months to be able to return once water levels went down.

Bradley is hoping he won’t see a similar situation this week and has already jumped into action for his neighbors.

“For almost two weeks now, I moved two and a half trailer parks, everybody’s trailers, their vehicles, all their possessions by myself,” Bradley said. “Now the water’s cresting, my stuff’s still down there and I have to get it up, and now my road is rotting away.”

The road he described is a short distance from his trailer and leads out toward a main road. Residents still hauled their vehicles in and out through the rushing water.

It’s a risky move, but Bradley says he’s determined to move through it if need be.

A property manager told KCRA 3 some residents are unprepared to leave their homes, fearing they’ll have nowhere to go and could lose all their belongings in the event of major flooding.

He expressed concern that leftover materials including metal and wood planks from the construction site of a nearby bridge might be causing blockage and leading to rising water levels.

Sam Chrun, senior civil engineer for the county’s public works department says the county has evaluated the county’s Crows Landing Road Bridge Replacement Project site to ensure there is no blockage that would keep water from flowing through.

“There is a trestle in the channel that was installed and is used to mobilize equipment into the channel to build the bridge,” Chrun said. “However, as a condition of our environmental permits, the trestle had to be modified in storm events prior to suspending work. This modification was completed by the contractor prior to the project’s suspension.”

Chrun added that the site is a safe enough distance around 6 miles away so as not to cause any flooding.

Meanwhile, water levels continue to rise, and residents say they are struggling with backups in their water systems.

An evacuation center is set up at Yolo Middle School.

Residents say they will be spending the night there if conditions get worse.

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